From nestling calls to fledgling silence: adaptive timing of change in response to aerial alarm calls

@article{Magrath2006FromNC,
  title={From nestling calls to fledgling silence: adaptive timing of change in response to aerial alarm calls},
  author={R. D. Magrath and Dirk Platzen and Junko Kondo},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2006},
  volume={273},
  pages={2335 - 2341}
}
Young birds and mammals are extremely vulnerable to predators and so should benefit from responding to parental alarm calls warning of danger. However, young often respond differently from adults. This difference may reflect: (i) an imperfect stage in the gradual development of adult behaviour or (ii) an adaptation to different vulnerability. Altricial birds provide an excellent model to test for adaptive changes with age in response to alarm calls, because fledglings are vulnerable to a… Expand
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