From medical astrology to medical astronomy: sol-lunar and planetary theories of disease in British medicine, c. 1700–1850

@article{Harrison2000FromMA,
  title={From medical astrology to medical astronomy: sol-lunar and planetary theories of disease in British medicine, c. 1700–1850},
  author={Mark Harrison},
  journal={The British Journal for the History of Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={33},
  pages={25 - 48}
}
  • M. Harrison
  • Published 1 March 2000
  • Medicine, History
  • The British Journal for the History of Science
After 1700, astrology lost the respect it once commanded in medical circles. But the belief that the heavens influenced bodily health persisted – even in learned medicine – until well into the nineteenth century. The continuing vitality of these ideas owed much to the new empirical and mechanical outlook of their proponents. Taking their cue from the work of Robert Boyle and Richard Mead, a number of British practitioners amassed statistical evidence which purported to prove the influence of… Expand

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