From mammals back to birds: Host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus

@inproceedings{HernndezOrts2017FromMB,
  title={From mammals back to birds: Host-switch of the acanthocephalan Corynosoma australe from pinnipeds to the Magellanic penguin Spheniscus magellanicus},
  author={Jes{\'u}s Servando Hern{\'a}ndez-Orts and Martha Lima Brand{\~a}o and Simona Georgieva and Juan Antonio Raga and Enrique Crespo and Jos{\'e} Luis Luque and Francisco Javier Aznar},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2017}
}
Trophically-transmitted parasites are regularly exposed to potential new hosts through food web interactions. Successful colonization, or switching, to novel hosts, occur readily when 'donor' and 'target' hosts are phylogenetically related, whereas switching between distantly related hosts is rare and may result from stochastic factors (i.e. rare favourable… CONTINUE READING
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