From fish to modern humans – comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head and neck musculature

@article{Diogo2008FromFT,
  title={From fish to modern humans – comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head and neck musculature},
  author={R. Diogo and V. Abdala and N. Lonergan and B. Wood},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2008},
  volume={213}
}
In a recent paper Diogo (2008) reported the results of the first part of an investigation of the comparative anatomy, homologies and evolution of the head and neck muscles of osteichthyans (bony fish + tetrapods). That report mainly focused on actinopterygian fish, but also compared these fish with certain non‐mammalian sarcopterygians. The present paper focuses mainly on sarcopterygians, and particularly on how the head and neck muscles have evolved during the transitions from sarcopterygian… Expand
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