From dopamine to salience to psychosis—linking biology, pharmacology and phenomenology of psychosis

@article{Kapur2005FromDT,
  title={From dopamine to salience to psychosis—linking biology, pharmacology and phenomenology of psychosis},
  author={Shitij Kapur and Romina Mizrahi and Ming Li},
  journal={Schizophrenia Research},
  year={2005},
  volume={79},
  pages={59-68}
}
Does the dopamine hypothesis explain schizophrenia?
TLDR
It is argued that the current model of aberrant salience explains psychosis in schizophrenia and provides a plausible linkage between the pharmacological and cognitive aspects of the disease.
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It is suggested that ketamine may provide an appropriate model to investigate the formative stages of symptom evolution in schizophrenia, and thereby provide a window into the earliest and otherwise inaccessible aspects of the disease process.
Salience and dysregulation of the dopaminergic system.
Functional neuroimaging of pathophysiological mesolimbic dopamine system and aberrant motivational salience in schizophrenia
TLDR
Overall, the increased bottom-up activation of the vStr may result from an intensified recruitment of this region during exaggerated assignment of salience to the conditioned rewards irrespective of the context, and the finding of disturbed cortico-striatal functional interaction in schizophrenic patients is in line with the dysconnection hypothesis of schizophrenia.
From the prodrome to chronic schizophrenia: the neurobiology underlying psychotic symptoms and cognitive impairments.
TLDR
Evidence links greater dopamine synthesis capacity to poorer cognitive performance and altered frontal cortical function measured using functional imaging during cognitive tasks, and the nature of other neurofunctional alterations in the disorder, in particular in the serotonergic system and neuroinflammation is reviewed.
A disturbed sense of self in the psychosis prodrome: Linking phenomenology and neurobiology
The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia: version III--the final common pathway.
TLDR
The dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia-version III is synthesized into a comprehensive framework that links risk factors, including pregnancy and obstetric complications, stress and trauma, drug use, and genes, to increased presynaptic striatal dopaminergic function.
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