From conference abstract to full paper: differences between data presented in conferences and journals

@article{Rosmarakis2005FromCA,
  title={From conference abstract to full paper: differences between data presented in conferences and journals},
  author={Evangelos S. Rosmarakis and Elpidoforos S. Soteriades and Paschalis Vergidis and Sofia K. Kasiakou and Matthew E. Falagas},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={2005},
  volume={19},
  pages={673 - 680}
}
Background: We studied the type and frequency of differences between data presented in conference abstracts and subsequent published papers in the fields of infectious diseases and microbiology. Methods: We reviewed all abstracts from the first session of 7 of 15 major research categories presented in the 1999 and 2000 Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy. For each selected pair of abstract and related published paper, two independent investigators performed a… 
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