From coercion to deception: the changing nature of police interrogation in America

@article{Leo1992FromCT,
  title={From coercion to deception: the changing nature of police interrogation in America},
  author={R. Leo},
  journal={Crime, Law and Social Change},
  year={1992},
  volume={18},
  pages={35-59}
}
  • R. Leo
  • Published 1992
  • Sociology
  • Crime, Law and Social Change
  • AbstractOur police, with no legal sanction whatever, employ duress, threat, bullying, a vast amount of moderate physical abuse and a certain degree of outright torture; and their inquisitions customarily begin with the demand: “If you know what's good for you, you'll confess. (Ernest Jerome Hopkins, 1931)1 Today, Ness Said, interrogation is not a matter of forcing suspects to confess but of “conning” them. “Really, what we do is just to bullshit them” (William Hart, 1981)2 There is an… CONTINUE READING
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