From basic network principles to neural architecture: emergence of spatial-opponent cells.

@article{Linsker1986FromBN,
  title={From basic network principles to neural architecture: emergence of spatial-opponent cells.},
  author={Ralph Linsker},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1986},
  volume={83 19},
  pages={
          7508-12
        }
}
  • R. Linsker
  • Published 1 October 1986
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The functional architecture of mammalian visual cortex has been elucidated in impressive detail by experimental work of the past 20-25 years. The origin of many of the salient features of this architecture, however, has remained unexplained. This paper is the first of three (the others will appear in subsequent issues of these Proceedings) that address the origin and organization of feature-analyzing (spatial-opponent and orientation-selective) cells in simple systems governed by biologically… 

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