From Woodcraft to 'Leave No Trace' Wilderness, Consumerism, and Environmentalism in Twentieth-

@inproceedings{America2002FromWT,
  title={From Woodcraft to 'Leave No Trace' Wilderness, Consumerism, and Environmentalism in Twentieth-},
  author={Century America and James M Turner},
  year={2002}
}
  • Century America, James M Turner
  • Published 2002
  • Geography, Sociology
  • In 1983, Outside magazine noted a growing number of "cognoscenti known as notrace or low-impact campers" backpacking into the wilderness. "As their nicknames indicate, [these people] keep the woods cleaner than they keep their [own] homes." The most devoted backpackers fluffed the grass on which they slept, gave up toilet paper rather than burying it, and preferred drinking their dishwater to pouring it on the ground. No measure seemed too extreme in their efforts to protect the wilderness… CONTINUE READING

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