From Self to Nonself: The Nonself Theory

@article{Shiah2016FromST,
  title={From Self to Nonself: The Nonself Theory},
  author={Yung‐Jong Shiah},
  journal={Frontiers in Psychology},
  year={2016},
  volume={7}
}
The maintenance/strength of self is a very core concept in Western psychology and is particularly relevant to egoism, a process that draws on the hedonic principle in pursuit of desires. Contrary to this and based on Buddhism, a nonself-cultivating process aims to minimize or extinguish the self and avoid desires, leading to egolessness or selflessness. The purpose of this paper is to present the Nonself Theory (NT). The universal Mandala Model of Self (MMS) was developed to describe the well… 

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