From Religious Freedom to Indigenous Sovereignty: The Case of Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association (1988)

@inproceedings{Lloyd2018FromRF,
  title={From Religious Freedom to Indigenous Sovereignty: The Case of Lyng v. Northwest Indian Cemetery Protective Association (1988)},
  author={Dana Lloyd},
  year={2018}
}
In 1988 the United States Supreme Court declared constitutional the federal government’s development plan in an area (known as the High Country) that was considered central to the religious practice of three local American Indian nations. The Court admitted that “It is undisputed that the Indian respondents’ beliefs are sincere and that the Government’s proposed actions will have severe adverse effects on the practice of their religion.” Nevertheless, because the disputed area was on public… 
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