From Meatless Mondays to Meatless Sundays: Motivations for Meat Reduction among Vegetarians and Semi-vegetarians Who Mildly or Significantly Reduce Their Meat Intake

@article{DeBacker2014FromMM,
  title={From Meatless Mondays to Meatless Sundays: Motivations for Meat Reduction among Vegetarians and Semi-vegetarians Who Mildly or Significantly Reduce Their Meat Intake},
  author={Charlotte J. S. De Backer and Liselot Hudders},
  journal={Ecology of Food and Nutrition},
  year={2014},
  volume={53},
  pages={639 - 657}
}
This study explores vegetarians’ and semi-vegetarians’ motives for reducing their meat intake. Participants are categorized as vegetarians (remove all meat from their diet); semi-vegetarians (significantly reduce meat intake: at least three days a week); or light semi-vegetarians (mildly reduce meat intake: once or twice a week). Most differences appear between vegetarians and both groups of semi-vegetarians. Animal-rights and ecological concerns, together with taste preferences, predict… 

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