From Logical Neurons to Poetic Embodiments of Mind: Warren S. McCulloch’s Project in Neuroscience

@article{Kay2001FromLN,
  title={From Logical Neurons to Poetic Embodiments of Mind: Warren S. McCulloch’s Project in Neuroscience},
  author={L. E. Kay},
  journal={Science in Context},
  year={2001},
  volume={14},
  pages={591 - 614}
}
  • L. E. Kay
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Science in Context
Argument After more than half a century of eclipse, the mind (in contradistinction to brain and behavior) emerged in the 1950s as a legitimate object of experimental and quantitative research in natural science. This paper argues that the neural nets project of Warren S. McCulloch, in frequent collaboration with Walter Pitts, spearheaded this cognitivist turn in the 1940s. Viewing the project as a spiritual and poetic quest for the transcendental logos, as well as a culturally situated… Expand
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