From Eugenics to Scientometrics

@article{Godin2007FromET,
  title={From Eugenics to Scientometrics},
  author={Beno{\^i}t Godin},
  journal={Social Studies of Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={37},
  pages={691 - 728}
}
  • B. Godin
  • Published 1 October 2007
  • Education
  • Social Studies of Science
In 1906, James McKeen Cattell, editor of Science, published a directory of men of science. American Men of Science was a collection of biographical sketches of thousands of men of science in the USA and was published periodically. It launched, and was used in, the very first systematic quantitative studies on science. Cattell used two concepts for his statistics: productivity, defined as the number of men of science a nation produces, and performance or merit, defined as scientific… 

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