From Clarkia to Escherichia and Janus: the physics of natural and synthetic active colloids

@article{Poon2013FromCT,
  title={From Clarkia to Escherichia and Janus: the physics of natural and synthetic active colloids},
  author={Wilson C. K. Poon},
  journal={arXiv: Soft Condensed Matter},
  year={2013}
}
  • W. Poon
  • Published 20 June 2013
  • Physics
  • arXiv: Soft Condensed Matter
An active colloid is a suspension of particles that transduce free energy from their environment and use the energy to engage in intrinsically non-equilibrium activities such as growth, replication and self-propelled motility. An obvious example of active colloids is a suspension of bacteria such as Escherichia coli, their physical dimensions being almost invariably in the colloidal range. Synthetic self-propelled particles have also become available recently, such as two-faced, or Janus… 

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