From Butyribacterium to E. coli : An Essay on Unity in Biochemistry

@article{Friedmann2004FromBT,
  title={From Butyribacterium to E. coli : An Essay on Unity in Biochemistry},
  author={Herbert . Friedmann},
  journal={Perspectives in Biology and Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={47},
  pages={47 - 66}
}
  • H. Friedmann
  • Published 20 January 2004
  • Biology
  • Perspectives in Biology and Medicine
New ideas in science frequently arise from neglected or distorted antecedents.This essay deals with the idea of biochemical unity, encapsulated in Jacques Monod's well-known phrase, dating from 1954: "Anything found to be true of E. coli must also be true of elephants." An earlier version of this phrase,—"From the elephant to butyric acid bacterium—it is all the same!"—was coined in 1926 by the Dutch microbiologist Albert Jan Kluyver. In that year Kluyver and his associate Hendrick Jean Louis… 
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