Friedrich Hayek and his visits to Chile

@article{Caldwell2015FriedrichHA,
  title={Friedrich Hayek and his visits to Chile},
  author={Bruce J. Caldwell and Leonidas Montes},
  journal={The Review of Austrian Economics},
  year={2015},
  volume={28},
  pages={261-309}
}
F. A. Hayek took two trips to Chile, the first in 1977, the second in 1981. The visits were controversial. On the first trip he met with General Augusto Pinochet, who had led a coup that overthrew Salvador Allende in 1973. During his 1981 visit, Hayek gave interviews that were published in the Chilean newspaper El Mercurio and in which he discussed authoritarian regimes and the problem of unlimited democracy. After each trip, he complained that the western press had painted an unfair picture of… Expand
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