Frequent burning promotes invasions of alien plants into a mesic African savanna

@article{Masocha2010FrequentBP,
  title={Frequent burning promotes invasions of alien plants into a mesic African savanna},
  author={Mhosisi Masocha and Andrew K. Skidmore and Xavier Poshiwa and Herbert H. T. Prins},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2010},
  volume={13},
  pages={1641-1648}
}
Fire is both inevitable and necessary for maintaining the structure and functioning of mesic savannas. Without disturbances such as fire and herbivory, tree cover can increase at the expense of grass cover and over time dominate mesic savannas. Consequently, repeated burning is widely used to suppress tree recruitment and control bush encroachment. However, the effect of regular burning on invasion by alien plant species is little understood. Here, vegetation data from a long-term fire… CONTINUE READING

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