Frequent blood feeding enables insecticide-treated nets to reduce transmission by mosquitoes that bite predominately outdoors

@article{Russell2016FrequentBF,
  title={Frequent blood feeding enables insecticide-treated nets to reduce transmission by mosquitoes that bite predominately outdoors},
  author={Tanya L. Russell and Nigel W. Beebe and Hugo Bugoro and Allan Apairamo and Weng Kong Chow and Robert D. Cooper and Frank H. Collins and Neil F. Lobo and Thomas R. Burkot},
  journal={Malaria Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={15},
  pages={1-9}
}
The effectiveness of vector control on malaria transmission by long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) and indoor residual spraying (IRS) depends on the vectors entering houses to blood feed and rest when people are inside houses. In the Solomon Islands, significant reductions in malaria have been achieved in the past 20 years with insecticide-treated bed nets, IRS, improved diagnosis and treatment with artemisinin combination therapies; despite the preference of the primary vector, Anopheles… CONTINUE READING
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Antimalaria program. WHO assignment report. (WP)MAL/SOL/ MAL/001-E. Honiara: WHO Regional Office for the Western Pacific

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