Frequency selectivity, multistability, and oscillations emerge from models of genetic regulatory systems.

@article{Smolen1998FrequencySM,
  title={Frequency selectivity, multistability, and oscillations emerge from models of genetic regulatory systems.},
  author={Paul Smolen and Douglas A. Baxter and John H. Byrne},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Cell physiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={274 2},
  pages={C531-C542}
}
To examine the capability of genetic regulatory systems for complex dynamic activity, we developed simple kinetic models that incorporate known features of these systems. These include autoregulation and stimulus-dependent phosphorylation of transcription factors (TFs), dimerization of TFs, crosstalk, and feedback. The simplest model manifested multiple stable steady states, and brief perturbations could switch the model between these states. Such transitions might explain, for example, how a… 

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