Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use.

@article{Woolsey2014FrequencyOE,
  title={Frequency of energy drink use predicts illicit prescription stimulant use.},
  author={Conrad L. Woolsey and Laura B Barnes and Bert Hans Jacobson and Weston S. Kensinger and Adam Etheridge Barry and Niels C. Beck and Andrew G. Resnik and Marion Willard Evans},
  journal={Substance abuse},
  year={2014},
  volume={35 1},
  pages={
          96-103
        }
}
BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to examine energy drink (ED) usage patterns and to investigate the illicit use of prescription stimulants among college students. METHODS A sample of 267 undergraduate and graduate students (mean age of 22.48 among stimulant users) from a large midwestern university and its branch campus locations voluntarily participated in the study. RESULTS Among prescription stimulant users without a valid medical prescription, Mann-Whitney U tests and logistic… Expand
Increased Energy Drink Use as a Predictor of Illicit Prescription Stimulant Use.
TLDR
The frequency of energy drink use was a significant predictor of the illicit use of prescription stimulants among college students and among prescription stimulant users without a valid medical prescription. Expand
Impact of alcohol and alcohol mixed with energy drinks on non-medical prescription stimulant use in a nationally representative sample of 12th-grade students.
TLDR
The need to better understand influences on non-medical prescription stimulant, energy drink and AmED use among 12th grade students in the U.S. is highlighted, as the combined effects of stimulants contained in energy drinks and the depressant effects of alcohol appear to be associated with increased non- medical prescription stimulants use. Expand
Correlates of use of alcohol mixed with energy drinks among youth across 10 US metropolitan areas.
TLDR
Underage drinking is common among youth and more than a quarter of these drinkers use AmED, and use of AmED is significantly associated with tobacco and marijuana use and nonmedical use of prescription stimulants. Expand
Do Energy Drink Consumers Study More?
TLDR
In this sample, ED users who reported academic reasons as motivations for use did not report significantly more study hours per week when compared to those who claimed other motivations, demonstrating a disconnect between reported motivations for energy drink use and outcomes that are expected to be associated with those motivations. Expand
Concurrent use of amphetamine stimulants and antidepressants by undergraduate students
TLDR
Health care providers of college students should query patients about symptoms that could be related to depression and amphetamine use, and prevention programs should target the risks of concurrent use of amphetamines, antidepressants, and other drugs among college students. Expand
Misuse of prescription stimulant medication in a sample of college students: examining differences between varsity athletes and non-athletes.
TLDR
Varsity athletes were significantly less likely to engage in past-year MPS and were motivated to do so for different reasons, and athletes more often cited a need to enhance athletic performance as the impetus for their misuse. Expand
To Study, to Party, or Both? Assessing Risk Factors for Non-Prescribed Stimulant Use among Middle and High School Students
TLDR
It is found that the age of onset and current use of alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana are most predictive of NPSU, which are substances generally associated with social and recreational consumption settings. Expand
The role of energy drink consumption in the intention to initiate marijuana use among adolescents.
TLDR
It is suggested that energy drink consumption (particularly heavy consumption) may be one early precursor in the escalation of substance use and it may be beneficial to include energy drinks in drug education curriculums. Expand
The Consumption of Energy Drinks Among a Sample of College Students and College Student Athletes
TLDR
Heavy episodic drinking and prescription stimulant misuse were both correlated with increased ED consumption and ED motivations differed based on the frequency of ED consumption. Expand
Weekly Energy Drink Use Is Positively Associated with Delay Discounting and Risk Behavior in a Nationwide Sample of Young Adults.
TLDR
Although weekly energy drink users did not show steeper discounting of delayed condom use, they showed a lower likelihood of using a condom when one was immediately available, and it is the first study to show that energy drink use is associated with monetary delay discounting. Expand
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