Frequency effects in language acquisition: A review with implications for theories of implicit and explicit language acquisition. (Target article)

@inproceedings{Ellis2002FrequencyEI,
  title={Frequency effects in language acquisition: A review with implications for theories of implicit and explicit language acquisition. (Target article)},
  author={Nick C. Ellis},
  year={2002}
}
  • N. Ellis
  • Published 1 June 2002
  • Linguistics
This article shows how language processing is intimately tuned to input frequency. Examples are given of frequency effects in the processing of phonology, phonotactics, reading, spelling, lexis, morphosyntax, formulaic language, language comprehension, grammaticality, sentence production, and syntax. The implications of these effects for the representations and developmental sequence of SLA are discussed. Usage-based theories hold that the acquisition of language is exemplar based. It is the… 

Language cognition: comments on Ambridge, Kidd, Rowland, and Theakston ‘The ubiquity of frequency effects in first language acquisition’

It is argued that any successful account of language acquisition must be frequency sensitive to the extent that it can explain these effects and it is parsimonious to begin with the latter and determine exactly what might be learnable of language by general cognitive means.

Frequency Effects in Second Language Acquisition: An Annotated Survey.

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between frequency and language acquisition from many perspectives including implicit and explicit instruction, frequency effects on morpheme

The ubiquity of frequency effects in first language acquisition*

It is argued that any successful account of language acquisition must be frequency sensitive to the extent that it can explain the effects documented in this review, and outline some types of account that do and do not meet this criterion.

Constructing a second language: Analyses and computational simulations of the emergence of linguistic constructions from usage.

This article presents an analysis of interactions in the usage, structure, cognition, coadaptation of conversational partners, and emergence of linguistic constructions. It focuses on second language

Constructing another Language—Usage-Based Linguistics in Second Language Acquisition

The data reveal the formulas, here operationalized as recurring multiword expressions, to be situated in recurring usage events, suggesting the need for a fine-tuning of the UBL theory for the purposes of SLA research towards a more locally contextualized theory of language acquisition and use.

Frequency and lexical specificity in grammar: A critical review

The current paper argues that the exemplar model needs to be augmented by a linear processing mechanism, i.e. automatization, in order to explain how lexemes and constructions are related.

Variability in L 2 acquisition of formulaic sequences : A study of linguistic factors in the use and learning of phrasal verbs by non-native speakers

In this paper, the acquisition of phrasal verbs (PVs) by L2 learners is explored from the perspective provided by a usage-based approach to language. This involves looking at low scope or

USAGE-BASED MODELS OF LANGUAGE

This chapter gathers relevant research from synchronic and diachronic research on grammar, from cognitive psychology and cognitive modeling, and from computational linguistics to give a cross-disciplinary view of why usage is so central in the mental processes and representations of human language.

Variability in L2 acquisition of formulaic sequences: A study of linguistic factors in the use and learning of phrasal verbs by non-native speakers

The usage-based approach adopted has allowed us to reveal the complexity of factors involved in explaining the difficulty L2 learners have in acquiring phrasal verbs.

Swedish noun-phrase structure in Russian-speaking learners: An explorative study of L1 influence and input-frequency effects

Articles pose a particular challenge to second-language learners whose first language does not have them. Variability in article production in these learners is often explained in terms of
...

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