Frequency-dependent ultrasonic differentiation of normal and diffusely diseased liver.

Abstract

The attenuation coefficient in 38 pathologically graded in vitro liver specimens was measured over a frequency range from 1.25-8 MHz and fitted to the power law model. The attenuation in the normal group (n = 17) exhibited a frequency dependence of the form 0.399f1.139; in the mild disease group (n = 13), it exhibited a dependence of the form 0.395f1.212; and in the moderate/severe disease group (n = 8), it exhibited a dependence of the form 0.391f1.325. Using a Student's t test, it is shown that, due to these differences in the frequency dependence, the statistical significance level at which the null hypothesis regarding the difference between the mean attenuation slopes of any two of these categories is rejected, is a strong function of frequency in the range of 1-4 MHz. The significance level relating to the difference between the normal and moderate/severe disease group is more than one order of magnitude better than the other categories. In all cases, no substantial improvement occurs beyond 4 MHz. It is also shown that attenuation slope values at 3 MHz confirm in vivo literature results obtained via different techniques.

Cite this paper

@article{Lin1987FrequencydependentUD, title={Frequency-dependent ultrasonic differentiation of normal and diffusely diseased liver.}, author={Tiffany S Lin and Jonathan Ophir and Grant Potter}, journal={The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America}, year={1987}, volume={82 4}, pages={1131-8} }