Frequency-dependent taste-rejection by avian predation may select for defence chemical polymorphisms in aposematic prey.

@article{Skelhorn2005FrequencydependentTB,
  title={Frequency-dependent taste-rejection by avian predation may select for defence chemical polymorphisms in aposematic prey.},
  author={John Skelhorn and Candy Rowe},
  journal={Biology letters},
  year={2005},
  volume={1 4},
  pages={500-3}
}
Chemically defended insects advertise their unpalatability to avian predators using conspicuous aposematic coloration that predators learn to avoid. Insects utilize a wide variety of different compounds in their defences, and intraspecific variation in defence chemistry is common. We propose that polymorphisms in insect defence chemicals may be beneficial to insects by increasing survival from avian predators. Birds learn to avoid a colour signal faster when individual prey possesses one of two… CONTINUE READING