Frequency-Dependent Natural Selection in the Handedness of Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish

@article{Hori1993FrequencyDependentNS,
  title={Frequency-Dependent Natural Selection in the Handedness of Scale-Eating Cichlid Fish},
  author={M Hori},
  journal={Science},
  year={1993},
  volume={260},
  pages={216 - 219}
}
  • M. Hori
  • Published 1993
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Science
Frequency-dependent natural selection has been cited as a mechanism for maintaining polymorphisms in biological populations, although the process has not been documented conclusively in field study. [...] Key Method Attacking from behind, right-handed individuals snatched scales from the prey's left flank and left-handed ones from the right flank. Within a given population, the frequency of the two phenotypes oscillated around unity. This phenomenon was effected through frequency-dependent selection exerted by…Expand
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