Freeze, Flight, Fight, Fright, Faint: Adaptationist Perspectives on the Acute Stress Response Spectrum

@article{Bracha2004FreezeFF,
  title={Freeze, Flight, Fight, Fright, Faint: Adaptationist Perspectives on the Acute Stress Response Spectrum},
  author={Haim Stefan Bracha},
  journal={CNS Spectrums},
  year={2004},
  volume={9},
  pages={679 - 685}
}
  • H. S. Bracha
  • Published 1 September 2004
  • Psychology
  • CNS Spectrums
ABSTRACT This article reviews the existing evolutionary perspectives on the acute stress response habitual faintness and blood-injection-injury type-specific phobia (BIITS phobia). In this article, an alternative evolutionary perspective, based on recent advances in evolutionary psychology, is proposed. Specifically, that fear–induced faintness (eg, fainting following the sight of a syringe, blood, or following a trivial skin injury) is a distinct Homo sapiens-specific extreme-stress survival… 
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