Free-ranging rhesus monkeys spontaneously individuate and enumerate small numbers of non-solid portions

@article{Wood2008FreerangingRM,
  title={Free-ranging rhesus monkeys spontaneously individuate and enumerate small numbers of non-solid portions},
  author={Justin N. Wood and Marc D. Hauser and David D. Glynn and David Barner},
  journal={Cognition},
  year={2008},
  volume={106},
  pages={207-221}
}

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