Free Will and Neuroscience: From Explaining Freedom Away to New Ways of Operationalizing and Measuring It

@inproceedings{Lavazza2016FreeWA,
  title={Free Will and Neuroscience: From Explaining Freedom Away to New Ways of Operationalizing and Measuring It},
  author={Andrea Lavazza},
  booktitle={Front. Hum. Neurosci.},
  year={2016}
}
The concept of free will is hard to define, but crucial to both individual and social life. For centuries people have wondered how freedom is possible in a world ruled by physical determinism; however, reflections on free will have been confined to philosophy until half a century ago, when the topic was also addressed by neuroscience. The first relevant, and now well-known, strand of research on the brain correlates of free will was that pioneered by Libet et al. (1983), which focused on the… CONTINUE READING

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