Free Radical‐Mediated Molecular Damage

@article{Reiter2001FreeRM,
  title={Free Radical‐Mediated Molecular Damage},
  author={Russel Joseph Reiter and Dar{\'i}o Acu{\~n}a-Castroviejo and Dun‐xian Tan and Susanne Burkhardt},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={939}
}
Abstract: This review briefly summarizes the multiple actions by which melatonin reduces the damaging effects of free radicals and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. It is well documented that melatonin protects macromolecules from oxidative damage in all subcellular compartments. This is consistent with the protection by melatonin of lipids and proteins, as well as both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Melatonin achieves this widespread protection by means of its ubiquitous actions as a… Expand
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