Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain

@article{DeMartino2006FramesBA,
  title={Frames, Biases, and Rational Decision-Making in the Human Brain},
  author={Benedetto De Martino and Dharshan Kumaran and Ben Seymour and Raymond J. Dolan},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={313},
  pages={684 - 687}
}
Human choices are remarkably susceptible to the manner in which options are presented. This so-called “framing effect” represents a striking violation of standard economic accounts of human rationality, although its underlying neurobiology is not understood. We found that the framing effect was specifically associated with amygdala activity, suggesting a key role for an emotional system in mediating decision biases. Moreover, across individuals, orbital and medial prefrontal cortex activity… 
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