Fragments of the earliest land plants

@article{Wellman2003FragmentsOT,
  title={Fragments of the earliest land plants},
  author={Charles H. Wellman and Peter Osterloff and Uzma Mohiuddin},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={425},
  pages={282-285}
}
The earliest fossil evidence for land plants comes from microscopic dispersed spores. These microfossils are abundant and widely distributed in sediments, and the earliest generally accepted reports are from rocks of mid-Ordovician age (Llanvirn, 475 million years ago). Although distribution, morphology and ultrastructure of the spores indicate that they are derived from terrestrial plants, possibly early relatives of the bryophytes, this interpretation remains controversial as there is little… 
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  • 2008
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TLDR
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