Fostering change in back pain beliefs and behaviors: when public education is not enough.

@article{Gross2012FosteringCI,
  title={Fostering change in back pain beliefs and behaviors: when public education is not enough.},
  author={D. Gross and S. Deshpande and E. L. Werner and M. Reneman and M. Miciak and R. Buchbinder},
  journal={The spine journal : official journal of the North American Spine Society},
  year={2012},
  volume={12 11},
  pages={
          979-88
        }
}
Mass media campaigns designed to alter societal views and individual behaviors about back pain have been undertaken and evaluated in multiple countries. In contrast to the original Australian campaign, subsequent campaigns have been less successful, with improvements observed in beliefs without the corresponding changes in related behaviors. This article summarizes the results of a literature review, expert panel, and workshop held at the Melbourne International Forum XI: Primary Care Research… Expand
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References

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TLDR
The aim of the workshop was to describe and compare characteristics and outcomes of back pain media campaigns that have taken place internationally and examine general theories of health behavior change from the mass media literature to determine whether it is possible to develop a theoretical framework to explain the observed outcomes. Expand
Effects of a Media Campaign on Back Beliefs is Sustained 3 Years After Its Cessation
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Significant sustained improvements in population beliefs about back pain were observed 3 years after cessation of a media campaign of provision of positive messages about backPain in Victoria, Australia, providing further evidence that a primary preventive strategy of altering population beliefsabout back pain may be a highly effective way for reducing back-related disability. Expand
A Population-Based Survey of Back Pain Beliefs in Canada
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Public back pain beliefs in the 2 Canadian provinces sampled are not in harmony with current scientific evidence for this highly prevalent condition, and strategies for reeducating the public are needed. Expand
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A Canadian media campaign appears to have had a small impact on public beliefs specifically related to campaign messaging to stay active, but no impact was observed on health utilization or work disability outcomes. Expand
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It is concluded that some practitioners hold beliefs reflecting fear-avoidance and that these beliefs may influence treatment practice. Expand
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