Fossils, feet and the evolution of human bipedal locomotion

@article{HarcourtSmith2004FossilsFA,
  title={Fossils, feet and the evolution of human bipedal locomotion},
  author={W. E. H. Harcourt‐Smith and L. C. Aiello},
  journal={Journal of Anatomy},
  year={2004},
  volume={204}
}
  • W. E. H. Harcourt‐Smith, L. C. Aiello
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Anatomy
We review the evolution of human bipedal locomotion with a particular emphasis on the evolution of the foot. We begin in the early twentieth century and focus particularly on hypotheses of an ape‐like ancestor for humans and human bipedal locomotion put forward by a succession of Gregory, Keith, Morton and Schultz. We give consideration to Morton's (1935) synthesis of foot evolution, in which he argues that the foot of the common ancestor of modern humans and the African apes would be… Expand
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