Fossil pollen records of extant angiosperms

@article{Muller2008FossilPR,
  title={Fossil pollen records of extant angiosperms},
  author={Jan Muller},
  journal={The Botanical Review},
  year={2008},
  volume={47},
  pages={1-142}
}
  • J. Muller
  • Published 2008
  • Biology
  • The Botanical Review
The fossil record for angiosperm pollen types which are comparable to recent taxa is evaluated, following a similar survey published in 1970. Special attention is paid to the dating of the sediments. Evidence for 139 families is considered to be reliable, for others the records are cited as provisional, pending the accumulation of more evidence. Some published records are shown to be erroneous.In the early Cretaceous only types occur indicating the presence of plants ancestral to Magnoliidae… 

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