Fossil evidence for the origin of Homo sapiens.

@article{Schwartz2010FossilEF,
  title={Fossil evidence for the origin of Homo sapiens.},
  author={Jeffrey H Schwartz and Ian Tattersall},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2010},
  volume={143 Suppl 51},
  pages={
          94-121
        }
}
Our species Homo sapiens has never received a satisfactory morphological definition. Deriving partly from Linnaeus's exhortation simply to "know thyself," and partly from the insistence by advocates of the Evolutionary Synthesis in the mid-20th Century that species are constantly transforming ephemera that by definition cannot be pinned down by morphology, this unfortunate situation has led to huge uncertainty over which hominid fossils ought to be included in H. sapiens, and even over which of… 
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