Fossil Records of Mendelian Mutants

@article{DiverFossilRO,
  title={Fossil Records of Mendelian Mutants},
  author={Cyril Diver},
  journal={Nature},
  volume={124},
  pages={183-183}
}
  • C. Diver
  • Published 1 August 1929
  • Environmental Science
  • Nature
WITH the help of Prof. A. E. Boycott and others, I have been engaged for the past ten years in collecting data for the study of the distribution of variations in natural populations. The species selected for study were the two common and very variable British landsnails, Helix (Cepæa) nemoralis L. and H. (Cepæa) hertensis, Müll. These snails normally occur in populous and well-defined colonies. In habit they are sedentary and apparently seldom move far from their birthplace. Most of the… 

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