Fossil Leaves and Fruits of Cercis L. (Leguminosae) from the Eocene of Western North America

@article{Jia2014FossilLA,
  title={Fossil Leaves and Fruits of Cercis L. (Leguminosae) from the Eocene of Western North America},
  author={Hui Jia and Steven R. Manchester},
  journal={International Journal of Plant Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={175},
  pages={601 - 612}
}
Premise of research. The fossil record of Cercis L. needs to be understood in better detail as a basis for reconstructing the evolution for understanding the radiation of Caesalpinoideae. The genus can now be traced back to the late Eocene of western North America on the basis of fossil fruits and foliage from Oregon and Colorado. Pivotal results. We present a new occurrence of Cercis leaf fossils from Teater Road, Oregon (∼36 Ma), that conforms to the species Cercis parvifolia Lesquereux… 
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Leaves and fruits of Bauhinia (Leguminosae, Caesalpinioideae, Cercideae) from the Oligocene Ningming Formation of Guangxi, South China and their biogeographic implications
TLDR
Bauhinia has exhibited a certain diversity with bifoliolate- and bilobate-leafed species in a low-latitude locality–Ningming since at least the Oligocene, implying that the tropical zone of South China may represent one of the centres for early diversification of the genus.
Genome Size and Ploidy Levels of Cercis (Redbud) Species, Cultivars, and Botanical Varieties
TLDR
It is found that floral buds of Cercis proved to be an excellent source of plant tissue for obtaining intact nuclei and all species, botanical varieties, and cultivars surveyed for this study had remarkably similar genome sizes despite their wide range of distribution.
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