Forming the lunar farside highlands by accretion of a companion moon

@article{Jutzi2011FormingTL,
  title={Forming the lunar farside highlands by accretion of a companion moon},
  author={Martin Jutzi and Erik Asphaug},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2011},
  volume={476},
  pages={69-72}
}
The most striking geological feature of the Moon is the terrain and elevation dichotomy between the hemispheres: the nearside is low and flat, dominated by volcanic maria, whereas the farside is mountainous and deeply cratered. Associated with this geological dichotomy is a compositional and thermal variation, with the nearside Procellarum KREEP (potassium/rare-earth element/phosphorus) Terrane and environs interpreted as having thin, compositionally evolved crust in comparison with the massive… 
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Planetary science: Making mountains out of a moon
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New calculations suggest that a collision with a companion at subsonic impact velocity leads to an accretionary pile rather than a crater, resulting in a hemispheric layer consistent with the dimensions and crustal structure of the topography of the farside highlands.
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