Forming a story: the health benefits of narrative.

@article{Pennebaker1999FormingAS,
  title={Forming a story: the health benefits of narrative.},
  author={J. Pennebaker and J. Seagal},
  journal={Journal of clinical psychology},
  year={1999},
  volume={55 10},
  pages={
          1243-54
        }
}
Writing about important personal experiences in an emotional way for as little as 15 minutes over the course of three days brings about improvements in mental and physical health. This finding has been replicated across age, gender, culture, social class, and personality type. Using a text-analysis computer program, it was discovered that those who benefit maximally from writing tend to use a high number of positive-emotion words, a moderate amount of negative-emotion words, and increase their… Expand
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