Formation of Phobos and Deimos via a giant impact

@article{Citron2015FormationOP,
  title={Formation of Phobos and Deimos via a giant impact},
  author={Robert I. Citron and Hidenori Genda and Shigeru Ida},
  journal={Icarus},
  year={2015},
  volume={252},
  pages={334-338}
}

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