Formation of Iapetus’ Extreme Albedo Dichotomy by Exogenically Triggered Thermal Ice Migration

@article{Spencer2010FormationOI,
  title={Formation of Iapetus’ Extreme Albedo Dichotomy by Exogenically Triggered Thermal Ice Migration},
  author={John R. Spencer and Tilmann Denk},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={327},
  pages={432 - 435}
}
Iapetus Revealed The striking appearance of Saturn's moon Iapetus—half black and half white—has puzzled astronomers for over three centuries. Now Spencer and Denk (p. 432, published online 10 December) present an explanation for this asymmetry: A thermally controlled runaway migration of water ice triggered by exogenic deposition of dark material on the moon's leading darker side, which faces the direction of motion of the moon in its orbit around Saturn. This mechanism is unique to Iapetus… 

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Iapetus: Unique Surface Properties and a Global Color Dichotomy from Cassini Imaging

TLDR
Thermal migration of water ice explains the observed color asymmetry of Saturn’s unusual moon, Iapetus, and reveals a global color dichotomy, wherein both dark and bright materials on the leading side have a substantially redder color than the respective trailing-side materials.

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[1] The recent observations of the Saturnian satellite Iapetus by the Cassini spacecraft support the theory proposed by us, over three decades ago, explaining the large brightness asymmetry between

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Abstract The albedo asymmetry of Iapetus is unique in the Solar System. Many models have been proposed to explain why the leading hemisphere has a reflectance 10–20 times lower than the trailing