Formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy

@article{deGroot2010FormaldehydereleasersIC,
  title={Formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy},
  author={Anton C de Groot and Ian R. White and Mari-Ann Flyvholm and Gerda Lensen and Pieter Jan Coenraads},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2010},
  volume={62}
}
This is the second part of an article on formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics. The patch test relationship between the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy is reviewed and it is assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde‐releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals with contact allergy to formaldehyde. There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to formaldehyde‐releasers and formaldehyde contact allergy: 15… 
Formaldehyde‐releasers: Relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, Part 2: Metalworking fluids and remainder
TLDR
There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to the releasers and formaldehyde sensitivity: 40–70% of reactions to releasers occur in patients sensitive to formaldehyde and may therefore be caused by formaldehyde allergy.
Formaldehyde may be found in cosmetic products even when unlabelled
TLDR
It could be difficult for patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid contact with products containing it as its presence cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling with certainty.
Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Metalworking fluids and remainder. Part 1
TLDR
The releasers in MWF that have caused contact allergy are presented with CAS, synonyms, molecular formula, chemical structure, applications, patch test studies, and amount of formaldehyde released by them.
Contact allergy to formaldehyde. Diagnosis and clinical relevance.
TLDR
Daily exposure to low concentrations of formaldehyde is sufficient to exacerbate existing dermatitis in patients with contact allergy to formaldehyde, and to assess exposure and clinical relevance in formaldehyde-allergic patients, the patients’ skin care products should be analysed.
Is Quaternium-15 a Formaldehyde Releaser? Correlation Between Positive Patch Test Reactions to Formaldehyde and Quaternium-15
  • A. Odhav, D. Belsito
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Dermatitis : contact, atopic, occupational, drug
  • 2012
TLDR
A statistically significant relationship exists between reactivity to quaternium-15 and formaldehyde; however, the severity of the formaldehyde reaction does not predict reactivity at patch test, suggesting quaternum-15 may not be a significant formaldehyde releaser.
Preservatives in cosmetics: reactivity of allergenic formaldehyde‐releasers towards amino acids through breakdown products other than formaldehyde *
TLDR
Clinical studies show the existence of patients allergic to formaldehyde‐releasers but not to the formaldehyde itself, and this work aims to clarify the role of formaldehyde in formaldehyde sensitization.
Hidden Formaldehyde Content in Cosmeceuticals Containing Preservatives that Release Formaldehyde and Their Compliance Behaviors: Bridging the Gap between Compliance and Local Regulation
TLDR
Applying good manufacturing practices (GMP), education, and regulatory control to improve the regulation and inspection of cosmetics containing formaldehyde releasers as preservatives, conducting research, and reporting the adverse side effects are highly recommended.
Cosmetics and Skin Care Products
TLDR
Mandatory ingredient labeling of cosmetic items in the EU facilitates allergen avoidance and EU-set limits on the concentration of known allergens seem to be reducing the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis to certain preservatives.
Allergic contact dermatitis in a girl due to several cosmetics containing diazolidinyl‐urea or imidazolidinyl‐urea
TLDR
The case of a girl reacting to several products containing diazolidinyl-urea and/or imidazolidinyurea is presented and patch test results to formaldehyde and other formaldehyde releasers were negative.
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Formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy
TLDR
The patch test relationship of the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy will be reviewed and it will be assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde‐releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals who have contact allergy toformaldehyde.
Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde‐releasers
TLDR
Formaldehyde and formaldehyde allergy are reviewed: applications, exposure scenarios, legislation, patch testing problems, frequency of sensitization, relevance of positive patch test reactions, clinical pattern of allergic contact dermatitis from formaldehyde, prognosis, threshold for elicitation of allergicContact dermatitis, analytical tests to determine formaldehyde in products and frequency of exposure to formaldehyde and releasers.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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