Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde‐releasers

@article{deGroot2009FormaldehydereleasersRT,
  title={Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Contact allergy to formaldehyde and inventory of formaldehyde‐releasers},
  author={Anton C de Groot and Mari-Ann Flyvholm and Gerda Lensen and Torkil Menn{\'e} and Pieter Jan Coenraads},
  journal={Contact Dermatitis},
  year={2009},
  volume={61}
}
This is one of series of review articles on formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers (others: formaldehyde in cosmetics, in clothes and in metalworking fluids and miscellaneous). [] Key Result Thirty-five chemicals were identified as being formaldehyde-releasers. Although a further seven are listed in the literature as formaldehyde-releasers, data are inadequate to consider them as such beyond doubt. Several (nomenclature) mistakes and outdated information are discussed. Formaldehyde and formaldehyde allergy…
Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Formaldehyde‐releasers in clothes: durable press chemical finishes. Part 1
TLDR
The frequency of sensitization to DPCF, occupational contact sensitization, relevance of patch test reactions, and relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of both parts of the article together.
Formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy
TLDR
Advice is given to patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid leave‐on cosmetics preserved with quaternium‐15, diazolidinyl urea, DMDM hydantoin, or imidazolidinyl Urea, acknowledging that many would tolerate some products.
Formaldehyde‐releasers in cosmetics: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy
TLDR
The patch test relationship of the releasers in cosmetics to formaldehyde contact allergy will be reviewed and it will be assessed whether products preserved with formaldehyde‐releasers may contain enough free formaldehyde to pose a threat to individuals who have contact allergy toformaldehyde.
Formaldehyde‐releasers: relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy. Metalworking fluids and remainder. Part 1
TLDR
The releasers in MWF that have caused contact allergy are presented with CAS, synonyms, molecular formula, chemical structure, applications, patch test studies, and amount of formaldehyde released by them.
Formaldehyde‐releasers: Relationship to formaldehyde contact allergy, Part 2: Metalworking fluids and remainder
TLDR
There is a clear relationship between positive patch test reactions to the releasers and formaldehyde sensitivity: 40–70% of reactions to releasers occur in patients sensitive to formaldehyde and may therefore be caused by formaldehyde allergy.
Contact allergy to formaldehyde. Diagnosis and clinical relevance.
TLDR
Daily exposure to low concentrations of formaldehyde is sufficient to exacerbate existing dermatitis in patients with contact allergy to formaldehyde, and to assess exposure and clinical relevance in formaldehyde-allergic patients, the patients’ skin care products should be analysed.
Formaldehyde may be found in cosmetic products even when unlabelled
TLDR
It could be difficult for patients allergic to formaldehyde to avoid contact with products containing it as its presence cannot be determined from the ingredient labelling with certainty.
Undeclared formaldehyde levels in patient consumer products: formaldehyde test kit utility
TLDR
It is concluded that product labeled ingredient lists and available information are often inadequate to confirm the potential for formaldehyde Exposure and chemical based spot test kits may have utility for identification of potential formaldehyde exposure from personal care products.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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