Corpus ID: 9972078

Formal Approaches to Modality

@inproceedings{Kaufmann2005FormalAT,
  title={Formal Approaches to Modality},
  author={Stefan Kaufmann and C. Condoravdi and V. Harizanov},
  year={2005}
}
1. Modal logic Modal notions are pervasive in the meaning of a wide range of expressions from grammatical categories, such as tenses, to the lexical semantics of particular words, such as modal adverbials (probably, necessarily) and modal auxiliaries (must, may, can). The best known modalities are the alethic 1 modalities necessary and possible. Other modalities include temporal, de-ontic, epistemic, and doxastic ones, and modalities pertaining to disposition, ability, provability, mood, aspect… Expand
38 Citations
Epistemic Future and Epistemic Modal Verbs in Portuguese
  • PDF
Actuality Entailments: When the Modality is in the Presupposition
  • 8
  • PDF
The future in Greek and Italian: metaphysical and epistemic dimensions
  • 8
  • PDF
Modality and its Conversational Backgrounds in the Reconstruction of Argumentation
  • 19
  • PDF
The provenance of modal inference
  • 12
  • PDF
Epistemic adverbs that can/cannot be embedded under imperatives
  • PDF
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-9 OF 9 REFERENCES
Combinations of Tense and Modality for Predicate Logic
  • S. Wölfl
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
  • J. Philos. Log.
  • 1999
  • 23
  • PDF
What ‘must’ and ‘can’ must and can mean
  • 693
Ordering semantics and premise semantics for counterfactuals
  • David Lewis
  • Computer Science, Mathematics
  • J. Philos. Log.
  • 1981
  • 187
Quantification over Times in Subjunctive Conditionals
  • 2
  • PDF
The Proper Treatment of Quantification in Ordinary English
  • 1,988
The presumption of settledness
  • CLS
  • 2002
Time And Modality
  • 649