Forests of the Past: A Window to Future Changes

@article{Petit2008ForestsOT,
  title={Forests of the Past: A Window to Future Changes},
  author={R{\'e}my J. Petit and Feng Sheng Hu and Christopher W. Dick},
  journal={Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={320},
  pages={1450 - 1452}
}
The study of past forest change provides a necessary historical context for evaluating the outcome of human-induced climate change and biological invasions. Retrospective analyses based on fossil and genetic data greatly advance our understanding of tree colonization, adaptation, and extinction in response to past climatic change. For instance, these analyses reveal cryptic refugia near or north of continental ice sheets, leading to reevaluation of postglacial tree migration rates. Species… 
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