Foreshock sequences and short-term earthquake predictability on East Pacific Rise transform faults

@article{McGuire2005ForeshockSA,
  title={Foreshock sequences and short-term earthquake predictability on East Pacific Rise transform faults},
  author={Jeffrey J. McGuire and Margaret S. Boettcher and Thomas H. Jordan},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2005},
  volume={434},
  pages={457-461}
}
East Pacific Rise transform faults are characterized by high slip rates (more than ten centimetres a year), predominately aseismic slip and maximum earthquake magnitudes of about 6.5. Using recordings from a hydroacoustic array deployed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, we show here that East Pacific Rise transform faults also have a low number of aftershocks and high foreshock rates compared to continental strike-slip faults. The high ratio of foreshocks to aftershocks… 

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