Forensic species identification based on size variation of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions

@article{Nakamura2008ForensicSI,
  title={Forensic species identification based on size variation of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions},
  author={Hiroaki Nakamura and Tomonori Muro and Shinji Imamura and Isao Yuasa},
  journal={International Journal of Legal Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={123},
  pages={177-184}
}
In this study, two new systems for species identification were developed based on size variation of mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions among animals: one was a conventional method using non-fluorescent primer sets and agarose gel electrophoresis and the other was an automatic method using fluorescent primer sets and capillary electrophoresis. DNA samples from 18 mammal, four birds, and 19 fish species were amplified using three primer sets specific for mammals, birds, and fishes… 

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