Forelimb anatomy and the discrimination of the predatory behavior of carnivorous mammals: the thylacine as a case study.

@article{Janis2014ForelimbAA,
  title={Forelimb anatomy and the discrimination of the predatory behavior of carnivorous mammals: the thylacine as a case study.},
  author={Christine M. Janis and Borja Figueirido},
  journal={Journal of morphology},
  year={2014},
  volume={275 12},
  pages={1321-38}
}
Carnivorous mammals use their forelimbs in different ways to capture their prey. Most terrestrial carnivores have some cursorial (running) adaptations, but ambush predators retain considerable flexibility in their forelimb movement, important for grappling with their prey. In contrast, predators that rely on pursuit to run down their prey have sacrificed some of this flexibility for locomotor efficiency, in the greater restriction of the forelimb motion to the parasagittal plane. In this… CONTINUE READING
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