Forelimb Posture in Dinosaurs and the Evolution of the Avian Flapping Flight-Stroke

@inproceedings{Nudds2009ForelimbPI,
  title={Forelimb Posture in Dinosaurs and the Evolution of the Avian Flapping Flight-Stroke},
  author={Robert L Nudds and Gareth J. Dyke},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2009}
}
  • R. Nudds, G. Dyke
  • Published in
    Evolution; international…
    2009
  • Biology, Medicine
Ontogenetic and behavioral studies using birds currently do not document the early evolution of flight because birds (including juveniles) used in such studies employ forelimb oscillation frequencies over 10 Hz, forelimb stroke-angles in excess of 130°, and possess uniquely avian flight musculatures. Living birds are an advanced morphological stage in the development of flapping flight. To gain insight into the early stages of flight evolution (i.e., prebird), in the absence of a living… Expand
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