Foreign-language experience in infancy: Effects of short-term exposure and social interaction on phonetic learning

@article{Kuhl2003ForeignlanguageEI,
  title={Foreign-language experience in infancy: Effects of short-term exposure and social interaction on phonetic learning},
  author={P. Kuhl and F. Tsao and Huei-Mei Liu},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2003},
  volume={100},
  pages={9096 - 9101}
}
  • P. Kuhl, F. Tsao, Huei-Mei Liu
  • Published 2003
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Infants acquire language with remarkable speed, although little is known about the mechanisms that underlie the acquisition process. Studies of the phonetic units of language have shown that early in life, infants are capable of discerning differences among the phonetic units of all languages, including native- and foreign-language sounds. Between 6 and 12 mo of age, the ability to discriminate foreign-language phonetic units sharply declines. In two studies, we investigate the necessary and… Expand
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FAST-TRACK REPORT Infants show a facilitation effect for native language phonetic perception between 6 and 12 months
Patterns of developmental change in phonetic perception are critical to theory development. Many previous studies document a decline in nonnative phonetic perception between 6 and 12 months of age.Expand
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